Archive for May, 2009

Horrified. Hopeful.

Penned by Nick

The NY Times covered a breaking story titled, “Critics Assail British Police for Harsh Tactics During the G-20 Summit Meeting“.

The footage (above), is horrifying. In defining the police’s perception of the protesters as the “proto-enemy”, the climate change debate has moved beyond the semantics and become frighteningly real.

Smart mobs of impassioned people are self-organizing to push for action on issues climate change. Popular demand for environmental stewardship is overwhelming. Alas, governments are slow–at best–to respond, and corporations continue to externalize their environmental costs of doing business. With unemployment at decade-long highs, civil unrest is growing, and putting people back to work is increasingly not enough.

Van Jones and other global leaders continue to emphasize the importance of supporting integrative solutions to poverty, health, and empowerment. Green collar jobs are one “pathway out of poverty” that will bring us a step closer to harnessing the power of market-based solutions to these crises. Putting people back to work in responsible, meaningful careers must happen now, if we are to reconcile social and environmental injustices that are at the roots of many inequalities: extreme poverty in the face of first-world over-consumption, curable diseases gone untreated due to the high cost of drugs, and illiteracy despite the spread of the internet.

The G20 will continue to be a forum for political theatre until true consensus translates into measurable results on crises like climate change: “Global warming is causing more than 300,000 deaths and about $125 billion in economic losses each year, according to a report by the Global Humanitarian Forum, an organization led by Kofi Annan, the former United Nations secretary general.

Change must come, and it must come soon–the people and the times demand it.

May 30, 2009 at 11:08 pm Leave a comment

What’s Happening Between the Cracks?

Penned by Nick

It’s been a busy few weeks. And I’ve been remiss on the blog.

While checking out a friend’s recent web redesign, I stumbled across the plugin below. Despite the fact that we’ve yet to find a VP of Engineering and our website is the bane of our existence, some cool stuff has been happening between the cracks.

We’ve seen our community grow by ~2,500 folks in the past couple months. Clearly a sign the recession is still very much with us. Our blog is taking off, courteousy of Carolyn and Christina. And our LinkedIn and Twitter followings continue to climb. Apparently our photo blog is getting some traction, too.

But the reality remains that California continues to lead the nation in job losses. It’s no secret that our practice has slowed precipitously from this time last year. Despite the tough times, we remain optimists. We continue to pull together to expand our message and realize our common goals, if at a glacial pace (any VP’s of Eng out there?). We know our time will come, though it may take some patience–something, alas, I’m learning to develop as we work to put 63,700 Californian’s back to work in good, green jobs. Bear with us…

May 28, 2009 at 6:40 am Leave a comment

Your turn to speak up…

We want to be sure the advice we’re throwing out there is what you’re looking to hear. Let us know what you want us to blog about by choosing one of these or suggesting another title/topic, and we’ll start scribbling!

May 27, 2009 at 8:35 pm 1 comment

Follow up Thoughts on “Why Your Resume is Getting Passed Over When You Apply Online”

Carolyn ThumbnailPenned by Carolyn

I’ve gotten some great feedback and questions in response to the post on 3 Reasons Why Your Resume is Being Passed Over When You Apply Online.

In response to the questions we’ve received, here’s a closer look:

Is it preferred and OK to attached the cover letter as the first page of the resume?

Yes and no. To qualify what I wrote last time (that you should put your cover letter into the body of your email), I would do so and then attach a copy of your cover letter below your resume, as the second attachment. That way it will also go on to your automatic file (depending on the back-end system the company is using).

As for combining the two documents, avoid it at all costs. It’s cumbersome, and where employers are making quick judgments based on a glance at your resume, having to scroll past a 1pg cover letter may be just enough of an annoyance for them to overlook your application entirely.

Is it an acceptable format to convert the Word document into a PDF when asked to include an attachment?

PDF certainly looks cleaner and you can make sure the formatting won’t get screwed up when someone opens your resume with a different version of Word.

My only hesitation is that some back-end systems have trouble parsing PDFs correctly, or creating “previews” of these documents for the recruiter to easily glance at. However, if a company or recruiter prefers one type of file to the other, they’ll probably specify, so just read the instructions and do what seems appropriate.

What if you’ve been heeding these recommendations since day 1 and you still never get any job interviews?

Unfortunately, following these guidelines for submission of your resume doesn’t necessarily mean that the content of your resume is what the company or recruiter is looking for – it just makes the resume and application more likely to be read and properly judged.

As for content of your resume and formatting, check out the Jobseekers section on our site for tips and guides.

Have more questions? Post them here and we’ll respond.

May 26, 2009 at 4:36 pm Leave a comment

Bright Green Talent’s Do’s and Don’ts of Cover Letters

We just started using Scribd to post our documents, such as a sample resume and our extensive interview preparation packet. Log in to our Greenhouse to access the others!

View this document on Scribd

May 20, 2009 at 7:45 pm Leave a comment

“Can You BELIEVE This Guy?”: Thoughts on the Importance of E-mail Etiquette

Carolyn ThumbnailPenned by Carolyn

There’s been a fair amount of news and public service announcements recently about kids and cyber-bullying – the basic concept being that kids will say things online that they would never say to a friend or peer in person.

This phenomenon unfortunately sometimes applies to adults as well. In your jobsearch especially, e-mail etiquette is just as important as phone etiquette, the way you’d speak to someone in person, or how you’d present yourself in a cover letter.

We’ve had several cases recently of finding people we were excited about putting forward for a job… and then we received an email from them that was rude, out of line, or just so strange that we had to reconsider whether we really wanted to support that candidate.

A golden rule of online jobsearching and interaction: you’re still dealing with PEOPLE. There is a real person – with feelings, and an ego, and their own personality – on the other end of the communications you send out.

Think to yourself – If you met the recruiter or hiring manager in person, would you still communicate in the same way as you do on email? Make the same claims? Use the same tone? Be as pushy?

There is a thin line between assertiveness and aggressiveness that is even harder to walk in the online space. While we’re not telling you to be too meek or passive, it’s better to err on the side of politeness than rub someone the wrong way and get blackballed altogether by the company.

May 19, 2009 at 5:10 pm 1 comment

What’s So Great About Green Jobs?

Some thoughts from our founder, Paul Hannam, on why people are so intrigued and inspired by the idea of a green job.

May 18, 2009 at 4:34 pm Leave a comment

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